Category Archives: WRU

pinocchio-nose-new

Reading between the lies

So, another worrying turn in the continuing battle between the Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) and the four organisations it still seems intent on bringing to heel – the professional teams represented collectively by Regional Rugby Wales (RRW). Weeks of quiet on the thorny issue of central contracts are threatening to spark into life over the WRUs apparent decision to compete with the Ospreys for the signature of tight-head prop Adam Jones. 

The four professional teams have long stated that they have agreed that,

The Regions will only play centrally contracted players on collective agreement between all four Regions – as part of a complete structural solution for the future of the game in Wales.”

Their united opposition to central contracts would remain unless the concept formed “part of a clear and proper strategy and agreed framework to achieve long-term solutions for player retention in Wales; and guard against any quick fix, ad-hoc action.”

So when Wales and Lions captain Sam Warburton signed a central contract with the WRU on 25 January , on the apparent understanding that he would be placed with his home team the Cardiff Blues, it raised the odd eyebrow.

Defending his decision to put the WRU in direct competition with a Welsh region for the signature of the Welsh captain, WRU CEO Roger Lewis suggested RRW’s opposition to central contracts was nothing more than a bit of playing to the gallery.

He stated, pretty explicitly, that the four professional teams had approached him and said,

“They were unable to contract six players. They needed assistance and help with Jonathan Davies, Rhys Priestland, Alun Wyn Jones, Adam Jones, Leigh Halfpenny and Sam Warburton. That’s where it all began and then when the participation agreement wasn’t signed by December 31st we put our minds to it… and thought how on earth can we keep players in Wales?”

Lewis claimed that his hand had been forced by Leigh Halfpenny’s decision to leave Wales altogether and sign for Toulon. Warburton’s agent, Derwyn Jones, was wheeled out to hint that the WRU hadn’t competed with Cardiff at all, but had actually saved Warburton for the nation.

Apparently, the WRU’s offer of a contract led the national captain to

Twice rejecting £700,000-a-year offers from big-spending French clubs. It’s understood he had already turned down one such bid from Stade Francais and last week he rejected another from Toulon after the European champions came back in for him.”

All very laudable, I’m sure. Much of the recent success of the national team has been built on a Partnership Agreement which has kept the bulk of Wales’ international class players at home, and provided national team coach Warren Gatland with access to these players in excess of anything afforded most of his equivalents in the northern hemisphere. Nobody would corroborate Derwyn’s story, obviously, and nobody dug too deeply into it.

Then Scott Williams, Alun Wyn Jones and Rhys Priestland signed for their Regions, rejecting the WRU’s central contracts. Everything pointed to Adam Jones, the last of the six, signing for the Ospreys. Then it all went quiet. A person who is (astonishingly enough) employed by the Western Mail started talking about Jones signing a central contract and playing for the Dragons. Their coach Lyn Jones, a reliable source whenever stories of Ospreys players signing for the Dragons rear their heads, said yesterday that Adam was very close to signing a central contract as negotiations with the Ospreys had “stalled.”

Today (9 April), Adam Jones’ region, the Ospreys, spoke to the Evening Post. The region’s Chief Executive Andrew Hore accused the WRU of

“Continuing to negotiate with Adam Jones and breaking a pledge that they would not compete with them for his signature. We received email confirmation from the Welsh Rugby Union on February 12 that they would not compete with us to sign Adam.”

“We subsequently discovered they were continuing to negotiate with him and have offered him considerably more.”

So that would seem to be pretty clear. The WRU have maybe been less than honest. Perhaps. Well, who knows. I trust them implicitly, of course, but others might not.

Interestingly, and hilariously, Wales’ foremost fearless purveyor of facts (given to him by the WRU) Andy Howell has started pushing a line that I confess to having missed: Wales coach Warren Gatland paved the way for the WRU competing with the Regions last December:

“What happens to players who are not wanted by the Regions and go to France or England but who are good enough for the national team? Do you just discard them? There needs to be a separate group of people who decide on what a fair market value is for players so they aren’t taken advantage of by the Regions potentially offering them, say £100,000 less because they know that player is desperate to play for Wales and doesn’t want to leave the country because he knows he won’t be selected.”

Never one to miss out on an opportunity for a spot of shameless toadying, Howell piles in:

“Say, for example, the Ospreys were only offering Adam £100,000 a year because they knew he was intent on staying in Wales, would it be fair? Not in my opinion because he’s clearly worth much more. I agree with Gatland, an independent panel would need to be formed to decide the market value of players if Gatland’s law was to be enforced, which I believe it should.” 

If the general narrative of today’s shambles is to be believed, it looks as though that independent panel has been formed. I wonder who’s on it? Whatever, we at least know that the six players weren’t wanted by their Regions, despite three of them rejecting central contracts and, er… signing for those Regions.

So it seems that, contrary to an email sent by the WRU to the Ospreys in February, the WRU (or an independent panel, natch) have decided that it’s perfectly acceptable to muscle in and compete with Welsh Regions for players.

The question we should be asking is, “Why?”

Why is it acceptable for the WRU to compete with Welsh Regions for players? What purpose does it serve? I suppose the WRU would argue that keeps players in Wales. Except it doesn’t, really, because it seems likely that both Sam Warburton and Adam Jones would have stayed here anyway.

Does it make better use of the game’s finances? No, because the WRUs actions are driving up the cost of Welsh players, and it’s costing nobody but themselves, the Regions and the Welsh game at large. But it is a handy little wedge which can be used to annoy the Regions and maybe create a few divisions.

It is irresponsible, it is underhand, it is duplicitous. In short, it is entirely consistent with the behaviour of the WRU and Roger Lewis. We are fools for expecting anything better.

 

 

David Moffett, the Chief Executive of the Welsh Rugby Union

“Moffesto” launched: former CEO lays out his agenda for change

Today former WRU CEO David Moffett has launched the manifesto which forms part of his bid to gain a place on the WRU board.  Moffett chose the Castle Hotel in Neath as the location for the official launch of his campaign. That choice isn’t a coincidence: the Castle Hotel is where the WRU was founded in March 1881.

Entitled, “One Wales – Building a sustainable future together”, the detailed document describes his vision to re-unite Welsh rugby.

Moffett says it’s time for change in Welsh rugby as the game in Wales faces a number of difficult decisions:

“Welsh Rugby stands at the crossroads and needs to decide which path it wants to take for the future. Under the current regime the idea of ONE WALES is as far from reality as is possible. The clubs are so removed from the WRU that they have become increasingly insular in outlook.

For the first time in Welsh Rugby history a candidate for election to the position of Chairman is releasing a comprehensive Manifesto, on which Welsh Rugby can decide.

With the release of my Manifesto the choices are very, very clear.

Either continue with the current dictatorial, undemocratic approach which has disenfranchised the community game or adopt a system which owes much to the past when the clubs had more say in the way the WRU is run.

The latter path is my vision for Welsh Rugby; the former has no place in a democratic union of clubs.

My Manifesto sets out what I would like to achieve in the next 3 years:

  1. The resurrection of the Community Game
  2. A partnership to secure and grow the Professional and Semi-Professional Games
  3. The restructuring of the Governance of the WRU
  4. A complete review of the financial performance of the WRU

I don’t pretend to have all of the answers, but I am fully prepared to take on board additional suggestions and constructive feedback to build on my initial proposals.

Playing my part

If the clubs endorse my Manifesto and believe that my strategic plan is what Welsh rugby needs, I intend to do everything I can to represent them as the WRU’s first independent chairman.

There is a better way of doing things, not just for the national team, but also for every aspect and tier of Welsh rugby. Welsh clubs are special; they have been overlooked for too long and it’s time for change.”

There are a number of key recommendations in the manifesto which Moffett says are necessary in order to realise his vision for change:

“The following summarises the key important recommendations I believe will provide Welsh Rugby with the strongest platform for sustainable growth. These points will be outlined in more detail in the pages that follow.

  • ‘Local solutions for local problems’ within the Community Game – a radical change in the relationship between the WRU and its member clubs
  • Replacement of the district representation system with five Regional Rugby Boards
  • Devolution of power back to the clubs
  • £1.5M immediately available to fund club Infrastructure grants, to be administered by the Regional Rugby Boards
  • An additional £2M to be made available to supplement Government funding in the crucial area of increasing participation
  • New 4G pitches prioritised for mini, junior, schools & youth rugby in every region
  • WRU Ambassadors to sponsor new advisory groups to design radical new approaches for age-grade rugby, Rugby 7s, women’s rugby, match officials and medical support
  • Support for Premiership and Championship clubs to identify & implement the key reforms, appropriate competition structures and financial support that they need
  • New Combined Player Contracts to be negotiated on a basis that benefits the WRU, the professional teams and the players. A unique opportunity exists to set a new benchmark in the increasingly difficult world market for players & coaches.
  • Five-year rolling franchise deals for professional teams
  • Expansion of the number of professional teams to be formally considered
  • Chairman’s Special Advisory Group to be set up to recommend a new approach for the Welsh language across Welsh Rugby
  • Reform of the WRU Board, including the appointment of an Independent Chairman, and the commitment to set a target number of Board positions to be held by women by 2020
  • Immediate external review of the financial position of the WRU
  • Sale of Millennium Stadium naming rights
  • Reduction in non-essential Board and Executive costs
  • Accountability at all levels of Welsh Rugby.”

You can read the document in full here:

One Wales – a Manifesto for Welsh Rugby by David Moffett

orwell

A Wall of Silence

It’s been two months since BBC Wales broadcast their “Scrum V Special“, a supposed “debate” about the current crisis in Welsh rugby. A group of us who were at the recording wrote a letter of complaint to the BBC expressing our concern about editorial bias in the programme.

The BBC eventually responded:

Thank you for your letter regarding our special Scrum V debate. We are sorry to hear your concerns about alleged editorial bias, the editing process and the interactivity of the debate.

 In your complaint, you raise concerns about the billing of the programme. I’d like to clarify that the programme was never billed  as a “Question Time” style debate. It was planned largely as a panel debate with some contributions from the floor.  The audience was asked if they had any questions they wanted to raise and a number of contributors sent their questions in beforehand. Our presenter saw these questions and he highlighted a few people he could turn to during the debate. As there was a wide range of issues to cover during the course of the 45 minute programme, we could not turn to every individual that wished to ask a question. However, we are satisfied that most of the key issues were raised during the course of the programme.

The audience was selected by the programme team and our aim was to reflect a broad editorial balance of those with a relevant opinion about Welsh rugby. We featured contributions from a regional and grass roots supporters group, a player representative, a legal expert, Paul Thorburn, supporters of Irish and English clubs, Mark Davies and former WRU and Regional Rugby Wales Chief Executive David Moffett. As well as the regional supporter groups, over 180 Welsh clubs were invited to send representatives to be in the audience and those who attended came from Cross Keys, Neath, Canton, Newtown, Penarth and Llanelli. A volunteer referee and people involved in Women’s rugby also attended.

Prior to the recording of the programme, members of the audience were asked to raise their hands, clap and show its reaction politely, but they were not encouraged to boo the contributions of others. The audience was clearly told, both by the floor manager and the presenter, to show respect for speakers and not to shout or barrack.  The reaction and interaction from the audience was important to this debate and we feel it was fairly reflected. The programme was pre-recorded and and it is not unusual that the recording overruns and the programme is edited to time. Some elements of the debate were dropped from the final edit because they weren’t deemed to be as editorially relevant when considered against the programme as a whole. I am satisfied, however, the programme was fairly edited and was impartial, accurate and balanced. 

We weren’t satisfied with the BBC’s response. So we wrote to them again. At the time of writing, we still haven’t received a response. Here’s what we had to say about their response to our complaint:

Thank-you for your response about the BBC Scrum V Special programme broadcast and recorded on 19th January 2014.

We believe your response contains a number of inaccuracies regarding the programme and fails to adequately address a number of the concerns in our original complaint.

For these reasons we are copying the BBC Trust Unit in our reply here.

We must stress that several of us were present at the recording of the programme.

Firstly, you state that the programme was not billed as a “Question Time” style debate. That is not true. I quote from the invitation email from a member of the production team, Cathy Williams:

“The programme is presented by experienced journalist Gareth Lewis (former Scrum V Presenter), speaking to a panel of 4 guests. There will be a chance for the audience to ask questions if they wish, or just listen and enjoy the debate!”

We can confirm that no audience members were allowed to ask questions during the recording of the programme. This is clear from the broadcast version.

Secondly, you state that the key issues were raised during the course of the programme. Whilst it may be true that a number of issues were raised during the RECORDING of the programme, quite a few of the important points raised did not make it to the edited version which was broadcast. For example, at one point, the presenter directly asked Roger Lewis for his view on the comments of Cardiff Blues Chairman Peter Thomas (for clarity, Thomas is on record in the Rugby Paper as saying that the Welsh Regions have “no confidence” in Roger Lewis). Mr Lewis repeatedly avoided answering that question. Most of the exchange on this topic was edited out of the broadcast version of the programme.

You claim the pieces that were cut from the programme were not deemed to be “editorially relevant.” We would strongly contest this view: what we had was a statement from one of the key protagonists in the issue, expressing his lack of confidence in one of the other key protagonists. This kind of statement is clearly relevant to the debate.

Thirdly, you list the various “contributors” in the audience. These included supporters of Irish and English rugby clubs. We were very disappointed that the Irish and English supporters were given more time to speak than the Welsh supporters, when the programme was supposed to be about Welsh rugby, broadcast to a Welsh audience.

Fourthly, you describe the encouragement audience members were given to show their reaction to what was being said in the debate. We can confirm that the floor manager, the bald gentleman with a headset, definitely told the audience that they could audibly show their appreciation or lack of appreciation of what was being said, in whatever manner they liked, and this included booing. He even made a booing gesture with his mouth to illustrate this. The only caveat he used was that we were to show respect and not use any offensive language.

At several points during the recording, the audience loudly expressed their displeasure and derision at the inability of Roger Lewis to give a straight answer to a simple question. However in the broadcast version, the audience’s reaction was only audible on one occasion, when Roger Lewis repeatedly tried to avoid answering a question. Technical shortcomings cannot be used as an excuse, as applause at the beginning and end of the programme was quite clearly recorded.

Finally, you have failed to address our original question about the presence of the WRU’s legal representatives at the TV studios on the day of the recording. We are still very concerned that their presence had a detrimental effect on the partiality of the editing process, and indeed, the entire format of the programme.

In our view, based on the evidence described above, the programme was not impartial and did not address the issues in a manner which was fair to all the participants. Unfortunately, this is only one example of the BBC’s consistently poor and unbalanced reporting of what is the most serious issue to affect Welsh rugby in the professional era. For example, when Regional Rugby Wales recently issued a very detailed critique of the WRU’s negotiation tactics in a letter to the National Assembly (see the RRW website, http://www.regionalrugbywales.com/2014/02/28/response-questions-raised-chair-communities/) this was almost completely ignored by BBC Wales television and radio.

We would appreciate a full and frank response to our concerns this time, and we would be happy to meet the production team to discuss these matters further.

 

Rotten

Ever get the feeling you’ve been cheated?

There are great deal of people in Wales who believe our institutions are run by a cosy little clique of self-serving men and women who get all the best jobs, creaming off our hard-earned money.

They may have a point. This morning, in a committee room at the Senedd in Cardiff Bay, the National Assembly (the people we voted for who are supposed to take responsibility for running things in our country properly and accountably) decided to wash their hands of any involvement in the current crisis in Welsh rugby.

Is it their business, you may well ask. Yes it is. The Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) is in receipt of a great deal of public money, as these figures show. The Assembly Committee for Communities, Equality and Local Government is responsible for sport in Wales. As the governing body of what many regard as our national sport, the WRU falls right in the middle of the Committee’s remit. So, definitely the Assembly’s business.

A bit of background for those who aren’t up to speed on this. Earlier this year, the National Assembly held a debate on the current crisis in Welsh rugby and this led to the Assembly Committee responsible for sport in Wales writing to the WRU and Regional Rugby Wales (RRW) asking them to explain their sides of the story.

The WRU and RRW both responded, along with a number of other parties, among them a group of fans representing Gwladrugby.com. All the submissions to the Committee can be seen here (PDF reader needed).

Today, that committee met to consider the responses it had received, and to decide whether they would make any further inquiry work into the Welsh rugby matter.

It must’ve been a cracking meeting. Here’s what these solid guardians of our democracy had to say on the matter:

“The Committee considered the correspondence received. The Committee agreed not to undertake any inquiry work on this matter and will release a statement shortly providing more detail about its decision.”

Wow. That must’ve been quite a meeting.

Given the amount of correspondence received on the matter, along with the huge gulf between the WRU position and that of RRW and the other groups represented in submissions to the Committee, it is astonishing that the Committee could decide that this issue was not worth pursuing.

Meanwhile, up in Cathays Park, the Welsh Government had also been hard at work responding to concerns regarding the current dispute between WRU and RRW. The Welsh Sports Minister must’ve spent all of 5 minutes coming up with this, er, “concise” response to a question from Bethan Jenkins AM on the matter:

“I have had conversations with the Chief Exec of WRU and 2 of the regions. I listened to their views and we discussed the current situation.” said the Sports Minister John Griffiths AM in his decidedly-less-than-comprehensive reply.

“I made clear the [Welsh Government's] view that they must resolve their differences as soon as possible in the interests of the game,” he concluded.

We have a phrase for this in the cynical, weary world of Gwladrugby: “Magic Table.” Essentially it refers to any empty platitudes which call on the various parties to “just get around the table.”  The fact is, they have been getting around a lot of tables, and none of it has worked, in spite of what the WRU spin in the mainstream media might have you believe.

All of this makes you wonder what reasons the Assembly Committee might have for trying to brush the issue under the carpet.

First of all, let’s have a look at the people who sit on this committee. For starters, there’s Leighton Andrews AM. Here he is with a couple of his mates.

gravy train
We’re all in this together

Back in November the Welsh Government trumpeted its new “City Regions” based around Cardiff and Swansea. Guess who was made chairman of the South East Region? Yes, it was Roger Lewis. Mind you, he’s always wanted his own region, so he must be really chuffed with that.

You might also remember the glorious day back in 2011, when Roger Lewis (you know, Roger Lewis, the CEO of the WRU) helped out his chums at the Senedd once again in the successful “Yes” campaign.  If you don’t remember it, here’s a photo to help you:

roger and leighton
Jobs for the boyos

OK, before you say it, I know there’s more than one member of the committee. But because Welsh Labour are in power in Cardiff Bay, they make up the majority of the members. And by the way, Welsh Labour are led by the guy holding the big silver plate in the photo up there.

Perhaps these titbits of information might have something to do with the committee’s puny response today. Or perhaps they don’t.

Food for thought.

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Welsh rugby crisis: fans state their case to the National Assembly

Back in January, the National Assembly held a debate about the current crisis in Welsh rugby. Following the debate, the Chair of the National Assembly Committee responsible for Welsh sport wrote to the Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) and Regional Rugby Wales (RRW), asking them to respond to a number of concerns which had been raised during the debate.

The WRU and RRW have responded already. Now it’s time for the fans’ response. Today we have sent this letter to the Chair of the Committee.

RE: The Welsh Rugby Union and Regional Rugby Wales

We have seen the reply sent by the WRU to your recent letter seeking information about the crisis affecting Welsh rugby. We note that the WRU stated that its intention was to give you some background to allow you to take ‘a fully formed view’ of the situation, and we would share that very proper concern.

Therefore we, the undersigned who have come together through the gwladrugby.com website, believe that, as concerned followers of the sport that we love, we should take the opportunity to also place our views concerning the reply on record, and in your hands. We have also taken the liberty of grouping our response under a series of headings.

‘The good of Welsh Rugby’

In any document emanating from the WRU, or in the frequent interviews that they give to the media, there is regular reference to ‘working for the good of the game’ or ‘working for the good of rugby in Wales’. Indeed the statements are chanted like some kind of mantra. This begs the question – how does one define ‘rugby in Wales’?  To Mr Roger Lewis it has a single, defined meaning – it means ‘working for the good of ‘Team Wales’. His entire focus is built around the need to project the national team as a brand and to promote it. It is our contention that there are other ways of ‘working for the good of rugby in Wales’ and they range from the people who give up their free time on a Sunday morning to run junior squads, those who turn up to support their local team on a Saturday in bad weather, to the backers of the professional teams who have to put their hands in their pockets from time to time.

The concern is exacerbated by the fact that recent statistics have shown that, while the income from the international matches have gone up, the number attending them have actually gone down! So the formula is to take more and more from fewer, more affluent spectators and corporate clients – a sustainable model we wonder? However this rich breadth of activity that we depict is not a part of his perception as it does not contribute, in his view, to the greater good of Team Wales. We suggest, therefore, that you should be wary of Mr Lewis’s frequent and gushing references to the WRU taking steps for ‘the good of Welsh rugby’ – those steps may actually be at variance with the ‘good of Welsh rugby’ in its proper context.

The WRU’s approach to “negotiations”

Throughout the response from the WRU words such as ‘negotiation’, ‘collaboration’ and ‘discussion’ occur regularly – indeed they, or their derivatives, occur more than 12 times. However the rhetoric is not necessarily matched by what is seen by many as the reality of the situation. A ‘Participation Agreement’ would suggest that it is agreeable to both partners.

Equally any extension of such an agreement would presuppose debate, discussion and agreement. The suggested readiness to negotiate does not reconcile easily with the statement of one regional CEO at a recent meeting with the WRU, who stated that the regional representatives were told that the Participation Agreement document was on the table for agreement only and not discussion. This is, in our view, a curious form of negotiation.

As stated the PA was not agreed on the last day of the year and the WRU suggest that 6 months of potential negotiation were lost – a curious form of negotiation. The WRU suggestion at the time was that it was all over, however seven days later a new, and very lengthy, document suddenly appeared.

Governance versus Control

The WRU’s view of its role and status bears some examination in terms of its implications. The need for appropriate governance arises from developments in the business world which necessitate better controls in businesses, particularly in businesses where ownership is disparate, as is the case with WRU.

Those in charge at the WRU were respected in the sphere of amateur rugby where they had great experience in the field. However the world of rugby changed radically with the emergence of the professional game that operates in a demanding business environment. But has the WRU changed?  The change in the status of the game clearly emphasized the need for a different relationship to be developed – and quickly.

However at the WRU the same people are still there on the new Board of Directors. Yet they have moved rapidly towards a new definition of relationships – the new perception is not one of governance, but of control. The WRU, it would appear, wants complete commercial control of the game in Wales. Here we enter a completely different context as the control position proposed is considerably more than simply governance of the sport. Here the personalities involved become key to the value and indeed the validity of the proposed change.

The current Directors of the WRU are a Chairman who, it is claimed, has extensive business experience, two National representatives – one with business experience and the other a respected former player who has had involvement in business and public bodies, the other directors – the majority – are representatives of the clubs at District level and many have been there since the amateur days. It is now intended that they, through their officers, should have complete commercial control of the game as well.

In contrast the regions are led by business men who have wide, successful experience in business – within Wales – and who have put their own money into the game that they love. Surely this is also acting ‘in the best interest of Welsh rugby’ – something apparently prized by the WRU? The directors of the WRU were eminently suited to the governance of the game in its amateur era, however they have little or no business experience of the type that can decide strategy with big contracts.

Fitness for purpose

The WRU is a private association. It has a business arm to deal with necessary business that forms a part of its activity brief. We take the view that, given the WRU’s size, income, assets and market value, there would be a completely different group of directors with a markedly different skill-set. In a world where there is the ownership of a massive stadium with its mortgage to manage and TV contracts involving millions of pounds to negotiate, is it not unreasonable to question the fitness for purpose of the present board of the WRU?

There is a dearth of appropriate experience in the business field which severely limits the Directors’ contribution in many situations and, at the same time, enlarges the power vacuum to be filled by officers. Perhaps the greatest indictment of the WRU is that it didn’t change when the game changed.

As a result of the inertia that accompanied the failure of the WRU to recognise the change in the climate of the operation that followed professionalisation, there is no representative of the professional game in Wales at Board level. Thus there is no representative at board level of the organisations that employ over 600 professionals working in rugby, and manage the academies that are key to the future and produce the stream of players needed by Team Wales. In the circumstances it is ludicrous that the WRU wants to control their activities without even allowing them a voice. The WRU will point no doubt to the panel set up to deal with the professional game, but will neglect to observe that they have also effectively emasculated it.

While the WRU is a private company and a business, it also performs a public function, given its permeating role in Welsh society.  It is perhaps best viewed as a quasi-public body.  As such, the decisions taken by its board should be subject to greater scrutiny and accountability in the same way that public bodies are.

In our view it is the duty and function of government bodies and, if appropriate, the judiciary, to provide such scrutiny.  We fail to see how the current board could possibly stand up to the even the slightest scrutiny: the board is wholly deficient in terms of appropriate qualifications and business experience.  Such deficiencies are manifest in the board’s abject failure to prevent its CEO from pursuing the single-minded assault on the regions – the issue which sits at the heart of the current crisis.

Central Contracts 

Much is made by the WRU of central contracts as though it is a single concept. Manifestly it is not, as there are as many different types of central contract arrangements as there are organisations that use them. It is not a single identifiable concept, but a handy term that is used as a short hand description of a variety of styles of operation.

The implementation of central contracts requires proper planning and the agreement of all involved in order to be effectively implemented. It will only work if it involves the whole squad of international players and will be a disaster if it only applies to a favoured few. When all that is agreed and there is adequate funding to bring it into operation, then the arrangement becomes one of the various forms of viable operation. However without those pre-conditions there is no situation in which it will be either acceptable or effective. The present proposal – to offer it to a limited number of players – screams out for answers to some key questions –

  • Will the centrally contracted players be given precedence in selection to justify the expense?
  • What will happen if a centrally contracted player has a loss of form? Will he still be selected anyway?
  • Is the WRU actually bidding against its own regions for players?
  • Where is the money coming from?
  • What message does the arrangement send out to the current rugby internationals of Wales? Does it tell them that they may be good enough to play for their country, but not good enough to be considered worthy of a central contract?
  • Where will they play their ‘club’ rugby if an agreement is not concluded with the regions for them to be loaned back to regions in Wales – will they have to be loaned out to England or France?

When a new situation leaves you with more questions than answers, you do not have a policy or a strategy – you have a knee jerk reaction that is designed to capture media attention and a clear sign that those responsible may be making it up as they go along. There is a major concern for the sport in all this – many have legitimate fears that the proposal is divisive within the playing squad and that is bad news – especially for Team Wales.

Conclusion

At the moment what we need is cool appraisal of what ‘is best for Welsh rugby’ – defined in the widest sense and we would respectfully suggest that such concern is not limited to the WRU. What we do not need now is reckless brinkmanship and the use of the media to spin biased points of view to the public. I am sure that the irony of the occasion was not lost on you, when the CEO of the WRU stated that the WRU was not negotiating through the media and actually stated it in an interview the radio! We also do not need an attempt to starve the regions into submission by denying them the money due to them by contract. Sadly, it was a tactic that we know only too well in Wales – it was much loved by the colliery owners who wanted to starve their workers into submission.

The relationship between the game of rugby and the people of Wales is unique. The relationship changed, in some ways, with the advent of the professional game. The current actions of the WRU will further distance the game from the people of Wales and that should be a matter of concern for yourselves at the Assembly.

We have seen it as important that you should know that there are two sides to this debate and we believe that it is important to make you aware of that fact for another reason.  It may have been brought to your notice already that the only evidence in the media that there is any coherence in the regions’ contentions, and that there is a different point of view to that of Mr Lewis, comes from the media outside Wales – a fact that, in our view, deserves to be properly noted and pointed out to you. In a country that prides itself on its democracy, it is less than acceptable that its people are dependent on the media in England for a fair case to be made. The media inside Wales, in all its guises, only seems to report what they are told by the WRU and we find that both sad and regrettable on the one hand and a palpable lack of an even handed approach on the other.

crayons

It only takes a minute

Throughout the recent debacle in Welsh rugby, I’ve been very impressed with the work of the regions’ respective supporters’ clubs. They’ve been to meetings with the WRU and RRW, and have published an honest account of proceedings.

Recently, I was part of a group of supporters’ club representatives who wrote a letter of complaint to the BBC about the farcical ScrumV “Special” programme which was recorded in January. A programme all of us who were there know was heavily edited to favour the position of Roger Lewis. The response we received from the BBC could be best described as inadequate, and we are now going to raise this with the BBC Trust.

On Monday 17th February, representatives from the supporters’ clubs met RRW to discuss the ongoing crisis once again. The minutes of this meeting have now been published, with the approval of RRW. You can read them here.

The minutes of this latest meeting are disappointing for many reasons.

Firstly, it’s not clear who was in attendance.

Secondly, the minutes have no structure and the discussion points are not organised in a way which makes it simple to understand the various issues which were discussed.

Thirdly, there are basic grammatical errors which make the document difficult to read. In addition to this, the minutes are not written in an objective way. In fact at several points the writer adds emotive punctuation, such as exclamation marks, which makes it seem like a rant rather than a serious account of a meeting.

I’m all in favour of people venting their spleen about something which they clearly feel very passionate about, but these minutes have been approved by RRW’s public relations representative, and are now in the public domain. Is this really the standard of document RRW should be putting their name to?

We all know that the WRU are never shy in putting their position forward in the media, while RRW have preferred to keep their own counsel, as Roger Lewis might put it.

If this is the best RRW can do, maybe it’s better they keep quiet. These minutes are a mess.

Let me try and summarise the key points, because some of them are worth noting:

1. The WRU’s proposal for a new PA

It appears the terms of this are even more in favour of the WRU than the original PA. Central contracts are the order of the day, and the regions will have to release players for internationals outside the IRB window at their own expense, with no compensation from the WRU.

2.  The new European Cup

The WRU have finally agreed to a new competition, not run by the ERC. But we already knew that.

Stuart Gallacher (RRW CEO) resigned from ERC once RRW had stated they supported the new Rugby Champions Cup, to avoid any conflict of interest. If Roger Lewis is involved in negotiations on a new European Cup, surely he should follow suit and resign from ERC to avoid a similar conflict of interest?

3. The outstanding ERC payments

The WRU Finance department assured RRW in an email back in January that the payments would be made as expected. The ERC board were supposed to meet before January to decide on whether the payment would be made, but that meeting never took place.

4. The TV position

Sky and BT have met, but there is no agreement

5.  WRU accounts

A thorough review of  WRU financial position is needed, in light of the surplus highlighted by David Moffett.

6. WRU governance

Are the WRU board holding CEO Roger Lewis to account? An independent inquiry is needed.

7. WRU Director of Rugby

Josh Lewsey was appointed by a one-man interview panel. What qualities make him suitable for this role?

8. Central contracts

Why is the WRU pursuing this unilateral policy when it is obvious they are not the solution?

9. Celtic League

There has been no progress in planning for the future, for example sponsorship, TV contracts and composition. What are the Irish and the Scots doing to help keep this league going? The Italians have already said they are ready to leave.

10.  WRU “loans” to the regions

These have to be paid back by 31st March, even though it is not clear whether the money will ever be paid by ERC.

11. The Anglo Welsh League

This is still an option. The English clubs are also anxious to have a competition to help them sell season tickets.

In summary:

None of this information is a surprise to those of us who have been following the issues. What is of most concern is that RRW don’t seem to be able to speak for themselves, and instead seem happy to rely on well-meaning but incoherent information from meetings with supporters.

If RRW want to achieve their goals, they need to adopt a far more professional approach to communication. The WRU are already miles ahead of them in the PR race. RRW are falling further and further behind by the day. This is too important a matter to ignore.